Great Falls Just Got A Bit Safer

We all want the town that we live in to be safe, and there are lots of ways that we can accomplish that.

Then it might surprise you to stop and think about how just one little sign can drastically improve the safety of the town.

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We've talked before about crazy drivers and how they can make you feel unsafe on the road.

There is one section of town where it doesn't matter how safe you or the driver of the other vehicle are; you practically need to be a NASCAR driver and a master of the left-hand turn to get through it safely.

I can't point to any scientific data, but I promise you that this one sign will prevent numerous accidents in the coming years.

A newly installed no left turn sign by the west side albertsons in Great Falls
facebook.com/michael.bicsak
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New No Left Turn Sign Installed in Great Falls

Great Falls resident Michael Bicsak posted this photo early Wednesday morning, and a collective cheer went up all around Great Falls.

If you don't know where this photo was taken, it's by Albertson's on the west side of Great Falls.

Anyone who has tried to make a left hand turn at this location knows 2 things.

  1. You very well could be sitting here for a while.
  2. When you decide to go, you better gun it.

Sure, the next time you're over there, you might end up forgetting you can't go left anymore when you pull out of the parking lot, but you will also no longer have to make a mad dash across traffic to make that left-hand turn.

Amazing what one little sign can do to make a town safer.

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